Businesses and Employers

On April 1, 2020, Governor DeSantis directed all individuals in the state of Florida to limit their movements and personal interaction outside of their home to only those necessary to obtain or provide essential services. Review federal guidance on essential infrastructure. See a list of businesses and industries considered essential services. Determine if your business is essential.

 

See the Governor’s Actions and Emergency Orders for the latest guidance for businesses in Florida, including the closure of gyms, suspension of on-premises food consumption at restaurants and bars, and remote work.

 

If your business has been negatively impacted as a result of the mitigation efforts in Florida to stop the spread of COVID-19, you may be eligible for assistance for Florida businesses. See more information.

 

If your employment has been negatively impacted as a result of the mitigation efforts in Florida to stop the spread of COVID-19, you may be eligible to receive Reemployment Assistance. See more information.

 

Preparing Workplaces for a COVID-19 Outbreak

Businesses and employers can prevent and slow the spread of COVID-19 . Employers should plan to respond in a flexible way to varying levels of disease transmission in the community and be prepared to refine their business response plans as needed. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), most American workers will likely experience low or medium exposure risk levels at their job or place of employment (see OSHA guidance for employers for more information about job risk classifications).

 
All employers need to consider how best to decrease the spread of COVID-19 and lower the impact in their workplace. This may include activities in one or more of the following areas:

  • reduce transmission among employees,
  • maintain healthy business operations, and
  • maintain a healthy work environment.

 

To prevent stigma and discrimination in the workplace, use only the guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to determine risk of COVID-19 infection. Do not make determinations of risk based on race or country of origin and be sure to maintain confidentiality of people with confirmed coronavirus infection. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features of COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.
 

See more information for businesses and employers to plan and respond to COVID-19.

This virus most likely originally emerged from an animal source and now appears to be spreading from person-to-person. Currently, COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Your healthcare professional will work with your county health department to determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19.

A person who is tested will have three specimens taken: oral, nasal, and saliva. The samples will be given to the county health department, who will then either ship or deliver them to the closest state laboratory. If a specimen is tested positive, it will be identified as ‘presumptive positive’ until the result is confirmed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

For more information on COVID-19 testing see CDC Tests for COVID-19.

The length of time that the virus survives likely depends on factors. These factors could include the type of material or body fluid containing the virus and various environmental conditions such as temperature or humidity. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other institutions are designing standardized experiments to measure how long COVID-19 can survive in situations that simulate natural environmental conditions.

Right now, there are no disinfectant products registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on environmental surfaces that are specifically listed as having the ability to kill COVID-19. However, related viruses that have similar physical and biochemical properties can be killed with bleach, ammonia or alcohol, or cleaning agents containing any of these disinfectants. Cleaning agents should be used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

For disinfection, a list of products with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved emerging viral pathogens claims, maintained by the American Chemistry Council Center for Biocide Chemistries (CBC), is available at Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Fighting Products. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.

No. The state of Florida has issued an executive order, which will reduce density and crowds in restaurants, bars, nightclubs and beaches to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The following restrictions are listed under the executive order:

  • Bars and nightclubs throughout Florida are to be closed for the next 30 days (see more information from the Florida Department of Business & Professional Management)
  • Limit gatherings to no more than 10 persons
  • Restaurants are required to limit customer entry to 50 percent capacity. Seating must be staggered and limited to ensure seated parties are separated by a distance of at least six feet, in accordance with CDC guidelines

Current CDC travel guidance is available here: CDC Information for Travel

Current U.S. Travel Advisories are available here: U.S. Travel Advisories.