Travelers

Governor’s Actions Regarding Travel

Executive Order Number 20-86
  • On March 27, 2020, Governor DeSantis directed all individuals entering the state of Florida from Louisiana to isolate or quarantine for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Florida or the duration of the individual’s presence in Florida, whichever is shorter. This includes persons entering Florida by roadways.  This order will take effect immediately. 
    • This Executive Order does not apply to individuals employed by airlines or those performing military, emergency, or health responses.
    • All persons isolating or quarantining will be responsible for all costs associated with their isolation or quarantine. This includes transportation, lodging, food, medical care and any other expenses to sustain the individual during their period of isolation or quarantine.
Executive Order Number 20-82
  • On March 24, 2020, Governor DeSantis directed all individuals entering the state of Florida from the New York Tri-State Area (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) to isolate or quarantine for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Florida or the duration of the individual’s presence in Florida, whichever is shorter. This order will take effect immediately. 
    • This Executive Order does not apply to individuals employed by airlines or those performing military, emergency, or health responses.
    • All persons isolating or quarantining will be responsible for all costs associated with their isolation or quarantine. This includes transportation, lodging, food, medical care and any other expenses to sustain the individual during their period of isolation or quarantine.

Domestic Travel

The COVID-19 outbreak in United States is a rapidly evolving situation. The status of the outbreak varies by location and state and local authorities are updating their guidance frequently. The White House’s Opening Up America Again plan means some parts of the country may have different guidance than other areas. Check with the state or local authorities where you are, along your route, and at your planned destination to learn about local circumstances and any restrictions that may be in place.

 

See the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

 

Travel Recommendations

Cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been reported in all states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Travel increases your chances of getting and spreading COVID-19.

CDC recommends you stay home as much as possible, especially if your trip is not essential, and practice social distancing especially if you are at higher risk of severe illnessDon’t travel if you are sick or travel with someone who is sick.

 

Essential Travel (outside your local area)

Some travel may also be essential, like:

  • Travel to provide medical or home care to others
  • Travel necessary for a job considered an essential service

The following travel recommendations provide advice about how to prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 if you must travel. Don’t travel if you are sick or plan to travel with someone who is sick.

 

Considerations if You Must Travel

CDC recommends you stay home as much as possible and avoid close contact, especially if you are at higher risk of severe illness. If you must travel, there are several things you should consider before you go.

Protect yourself and others during your trip:

  • Clean your hands often.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub your hands together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with others.
  • Wear a cloth face covering in public.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Pick up food at drive-throughs, curbside restaurant service, or stores. Do not dine in restaurants if that is prohibited by state or local guidance.
Types of Travel

Some types of travel (bus, plane, train) may require sitting next to others for a period of time. Travel may also expose you to new parts of the country with differing levels of community transmission. And, if you’re infected, your travel may put others at risk– along the way, at your destination, and when you return home.

If you must travel, consider the following risks you might face, depending on what type of travel you are planning:

  • Air travelBecause of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights. However, there may be a risk of getting COVID-19 on crowded flights if there are other travelers on board with COVID-19.
  • Bus or train travelSitting or standing within 6 feet of others for a prolonged period of time can put you at risk of getting or spreading COVID-19.
  • Car travel: The stops you need to make along the way could put you and others in the car with you in close contact with others who could be infected.
  • RV travel: Traveling by RV means you may have to stop less often for food or bathrooms, but RV travelers typically have to stop at RV parks overnight and other public places to get gas and supplies. These stops may put you and those with you in the RV in close contact with others who could be infected.
State and Local Travel Restrictions or Orders

CDC recommends you stay home as much as possible and avoid close contact, especially if you are at higher risk of severe illnessIf you must travel, follow any state and local travel restrictions currently in place. It is possible that some state and local governments may put in place travel restrictions, stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders, mandated quarantines upon arrival, or even state border closures while you are traveling. For more information and travel guidance, check with the state or local health department where you are, along your route, and at your planned destination. Just because there are no restrictions at the time you plan to leave does not mean there won’t be restrictions in place when you arrive.

Lodging

CDC recommends you stay home as much as possible and avoid close contact, especially if you are at higher risk of severe illness. Staying in temporary accommodations (hotels, motels, and rental properties) may expose you to the virus through person-to-person contact and possibly through contact with contaminated surfaces and objects.

If you must stay in a hotel, motel, or rental property:
  • Take the same steps you would in other public places—for example, avoid close contact with others, wash your hands often, and wear a cloth face covering.
  • When you get to your room or rental property, clean and disinfect all high-touch surfaces. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, remote controls, toilets, and sink faucets.
    • Bring an EPA-registered disinfectant and other personal cleaning supplies, including cloths and disposable gloves.
  • Wash any plates, cups, or silverware (other than pre-wrapped plastic) before using.
Road Trips

CDC recommends you stay home as much as possible and practice social distancing, especially if you are at higher risk of severe illness.  However, if you must travel, be aware that many businesses (such as restaurants and hotels) may be closed.

Anticipate your needs before you go:

  • Prepare food and water for the road. Pack non-perishables in case restaurants and stores are closed.
  • Bring any medicines you may need for the duration of your trip.
  • Pack a sufficient amount of alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol) and keep it in a place that is readily available.
  • Book accommodations in advance if you must stay somewhere overnight.
    • Plan to make as few stops as possible, but make sure you rest when you feel drowsy or sleepy.
    • Bring an EPA-registered disinfectant and other personal cleaning supplies.

Don’t travel if you are sick or plan to travel with someone who is sick.

International Travel

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial travel options remain available, U.S. citizens should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite length of time. For more information, visit the Department of State website.

 

See the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

See the latest COVID-19 map on travel recommendations by country from the CDC.

CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential international travel. If you must travel:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Avoid traveling if you are sick.

If you traveled internationally in the last 14 days:

  • Stay home, monitor your health, and practice social distancing for 14 days after you return from travel. Social distancing means staying out of crowded places, avoiding group gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.
  • Learn more about what to do if you are sick after travel.
Level 3 Travel Health Notice (widespread, ongoing transmission, without restrictions on entry to the U.S.):

CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to all global destinations

 

How to protect yourself and others:

Stay at home or otherwise self-isolate in one location for 14 days from the time you left an area with widespread, ongoing community spread (Level 3 Travel Health Notice countries) and practice social distancing.

Take these steps to monitor your health and practice social distancing:

  • Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day and monitor for fever. Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
  • Stay home and avoid contact with others. Do not go to work or school for this 14-day period. Discuss your work situation with your employer before returning to work.
  • Do not take public transportation, taxis, or ride-shares during the time you are practicing social distancing.
  • Avoid crowded places (such as shopping centers and movie theaters) and limit your activities in public.
  • Keep your distance from others (about 6 feet or 2 meters).

Cruise Ship Travel

See the latest information on cruise ship travel. 

CDC recommends that all people defer travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, worldwide. That’s because the risk of COVID-19 on cruise ships is high. Older adults and people with serious chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease, should especially defer travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, because of their increased risk for severe disease.

Passengers who return from a cruise ship or river cruise voyage are advised to stay home for 14 days, monitor their health, and practice social distancing.

CDC has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for cruise ship travel.

If you were on a cruise in the past 14 days:
  • Stay home for 14 days from the time you disembark, practice social distancing, and monitor your health. Social distancing means staying out of crowded places, avoiding group gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.
  • What to do if you are sick after travel.
If you are returning to an international port or disembarking an international river cruise:
  • Your return travel plans may be impacted. Foreign health officials may implement formal quarantine procedures if they identify a case of COVID-19 aboard your cruise ship.
  • If you travel on a cruise ship or river cruise and disembark in a foreign port, you might not be able to receive appropriate medical care or be medically evacuated if you get sick.
  • Some countries might refuse to dock your ship or allow passengers to disembark.
What to do if you get sick:

If you get sick with fever or cough in the 14 days after you return from travel:

  • Stay home. Avoid contact with others.
  • You might have COVID-19; most people are able to recover at home without medical care.
  • If you have trouble breathing or are worried about your symptoms, call or text a health care provider. Tell them about your recent cruise ship or river cruise travel and your symptoms.
  • Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room.

If you need to seek essential medical care for other reasons, such as dialysis, call ahead to your doctor and tell them about your recent cruise ship or river cruise travel.

 

Related Outreach Materials

Infographic: International Travel

Domestic Travel: The COVID-19 outbreak in United States is a rapidly evolving situation. The status of the outbreak varies by location and state and local authorities are updating their guidance frequently. The White House’s Opening Up America Again plan means some parts of the country may have different guidance than other areas. Check with the state or local authorities where you are, along your route, and at your planned destination to learn about local circumstances and any restrictions that may be in place.

International Travel: The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial travel options remain available, U.S. citizens should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite length of time. For more information, visit the Department of State website.

For more detailed information: https://floridahealthcovid19.gov/travelers/

This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment can change daily. For the latest national situation report please visit the CDC’s website. For current information concerning Florida visit the Florida Department of Health website.

The time between exposure to the COVID-19 virus and onset of symptoms is called the “incubation period.” The incubation period for COVID-19 is typically 2 to 14 days, although in some cases it may be longer.

The length of time that the virus survives likely depends on factors. These factors could include the type of material or body fluid containing the virus and various environmental conditions such as temperature or humidity. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other institutions are designing standardized experiments to measure how long COVID-19 can survive in situations that simulate natural environmental conditions.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a list of EPA-registered disinfectant products that have qualified for use against SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The list of disinfectant products can be found at https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2.