Travelers

Governor’s Actions Regarding Travel

Executive Order Number 20-86
  • On March 27, 2020, Governor DeSantis directed all individuals entering the state of Florida from Louisiana to isolate or quarantine for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Florida or the duration of the individual’s presence in Florida, whichever is shorter. This includes persons entering Florida by roadways.  This order will take effect immediately. 
    • This Executive Order does not apply to individuals employed by airlines or those performing military, emergency, or health responses.
    • All persons isolating or quarantining will be responsible for all costs associated with their isolation or quarantine. This includes transportation, lodging, food, medical care and any other expenses to sustain the individual during their period of isolation or quarantine.
Executive Order Number 20-82
  • On March 24, 2020, Governor DeSantis directed all individuals entering the state of Florida from the New York Tri-State Area (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) to isolate or quarantine for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Florida or the duration of the individual’s presence in Florida, whichever is shorter. This order will take effect immediately. 
    • This Executive Order does not apply to individuals employed by airlines or those performing military, emergency, or health responses.
    • All persons isolating or quarantining will be responsible for all costs associated with their isolation or quarantine. This includes transportation, lodging, food, medical care and any other expenses to sustain the individual during their period of isolation or quarantine.

Travelers from Countries with Ongoing Transmission

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial travel options remain available, U.S. citizens should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite length of time. For more information, visit the Department of State website.

 

See the latest information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

See the latest COVID-19 map on travel recommendations by country from the CDC.

CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential international travel. If you must travel:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Avoid traveling if you are sick.

If you traveled internationally in the last 14 days:

  • Stay home, monitor your health, and practice social distancing for 14 days after you return from travel. Social distancing means staying out of crowded places, avoiding group gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.
  • Learn more about what to do if you are sick after travel.
Level 3 Travel Health Notice (widespread, ongoing transmission, with restrictions on entry to the U.S.):

CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to the following destinations. Most foreign nationals who have been in one of these countries during the previous 14 days will not be allowed to enter the United States.

  • China
  • Iran
  • Europe: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Monaco, San Marino, Vatican City
  • United Kingdom: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
  • Ireland
Level 3 Travel Health Notice (widespread, ongoing transmission, without restrictions on entry to the U.S.):

CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to all global destinations

 

How to protect yourself and others:

Stay at home or otherwise self-isolate in one location for 14 days from the time you left an area with widespread, ongoing community spread (Level 3 Travel Health Notice countries) and practice social distancing.

Take these steps to monitor your health and practice social distancing:

  • Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day and monitor for fever. Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
  • Stay home and avoid contact with others. Do not go to work or school for this 14-day period. Discuss your work situation with your employer before returning to work.
  • Do not take public transportation, taxis, or ride-shares during the time you are practicing social distancing.
  • Avoid crowded places (such as shopping centers and movie theaters) and limit your activities in public.
  • Keep your distance from others (about 6 feet or 2 meters).

 

Cruise Ship Travel

See the latest information on cruise ship travel. 

CDC recommends that all people defer travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, worldwide. That’s because the risk of COVID-19 on cruise ships is high. Older adults and people with serious chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease, should especially defer travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, because of their increased risk for severe disease.

Passengers who return from a cruise ship or river cruise voyage are advised to stay home for 14 days, monitor their health, and practice social distancing.

CDC has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for cruise ship travel.

If you were on a cruise in the past 14 days:
  • Stay home for 14 days from the time you disembark, practice social distancing, and monitor your health. Social distancing means staying out of crowded places, avoiding group gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.
  • What to do if you are sick after travel.
If you are returning to an international port or disembarking an international river cruise:
  • Your return travel plans may be impacted. Foreign health officials may implement formal quarantine procedures if they identify a case of COVID-19 aboard your cruise ship.
  • If you travel on a cruise ship or river cruise and disembark in a foreign port, you might not be able to receive appropriate medical care or be medically evacuated if you get sick.
  • Some countries might refuse to dock your ship or allow passengers to disembark.
What to do if you get sick:

If you get sick with fever or cough in the 14 days after you return from travel:

  • Stay home. Avoid contact with others.
  • You might have COVID-19; most people are able to recover at home without medical care.
  • If you have trouble breathing or are worried about your symptoms, call or text a health care provider. Tell them about your recent cruise ship or river cruise travel and your symptoms.
  • Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room.

If you need to seek essential medical care for other reasons, such as dialysis, call ahead to your doctor and tell them about your recent cruise ship or river cruise travel.

 

Related Outreach Materials

Infographic: International Travel

Current CDC travel guidance is available here: CDC Information for Travel

Current U.S. Travel Advisories are available here: U.S. Travel Advisories.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment can change daily. For the latest global situation report please visit WHOs website https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/situation-reports/The latest national situation summary updates are available on CDC’s web page COVID-19. For current information concerning Florida visit the Florida Department of Health website.

The time between exposure to the COVID-19 virus and onset of symptoms is called the “incubation period.” The incubation period for COVID-19 is typically 2 to 14 days, although in some cases it may be longer.

The length of time that the virus survives likely depends on factors. These factors could include the type of material or body fluid containing the virus and various environmental conditions such as temperature or humidity. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other institutions are designing standardized experiments to measure how long COVID-19 can survive in situations that simulate natural environmental conditions.

Right now, there are no disinfectant products registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on environmental surfaces that are specifically listed as having the ability to kill COVID-19. However, related viruses that have similar physical and biochemical properties can be killed with bleach, ammonia or alcohol, or cleaning agents containing any of these disinfectants. Cleaning agents should be used according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

For disinfection, a list of products with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved emerging viral pathogens claims, maintained by the American Chemistry Council Center for Biocide Chemistries (CBC), is available at Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Fighting Products. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products.